Shattering Heat Records Everywhere!

THE FOLLOWING ARE EXCEPTS OF INFORMATION COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NORTH LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS.

…RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SET AT LITTLE ROCK ADAMS FIELD…
A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 114 DEGREES WAS SET AT LITTLE ROCK
ADAMS FIELD TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 107 SET IN 2010.
THIS ALSO BREAKS THE ALL TIME RECORD HIGH OF 112 DEGREES SET ON JULY
31ST 1986.

…RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SET AT NORTH LITTLE ROCK…
A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 111 DEGREES WAS SET AT NORTH LITTLE
ROCK TODAY. THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 104 SET IN 2010. THIS ALSO
TIES THE ALL TIME RECORD HIGH OF 111 DEGREES SET ON AUGUST 30TH 2000.

…RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SET AT PINE BLUFF…
A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 109 DEGREES WAS SET AT PINE BLUFF
TODAY. THIS TIES THE OLD RECORD OF 109 SET IN 1918.

…RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SET AT HARRISON…
A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 110 DEGREES WAS SET AT HARRISON TODAY.
THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 106 SET IN 1934.

…RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SET AT HOT SPRINGS…
A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 106 DEGREES WAS SET AT HOT SPRINGS TODAY.
THIS TIES THE OLD RECORD OF 106 SET IN 2008.

…DANGEROUSLY HOT CONDITIONS WILL CONTINUE THROUGH SATURDAY…

UPPER LEVEL HIGH PRESSURE WILL PERSIST THROUGH THE REST OF THE
WEEK. HIGH TEMPERATURES WILL CONTINUE TO EXCEED 100 DEGREES OVER
MUCH OF THE AREA…WITH SEVERAL LOCATIONS OVER 110 DEGREES THIS
AFTERNOON. HEAT INDICES WILL CONTINUE TO EXCEED 115 DEGREES IN
PORTIONS OF THE AREA THIS AFTERNOON…AND LIKELY EXCEED 115
DEGREES IN SOUTHEASTERN ARKANSAS THURSDAY AFTERNOON. LATER THIS
WEEK…SLIGHTLY COOLER TEMPERATURES WILL BE SEEN…BUT WITH
TEMPERATURES EXPECTED TO STILL REMAIN ABOVE 100 DEGREES AT MANY
SPOTS. HEAT INDICES WILL ALSO REMAIN ABOVE 105 DEGREES DURING THE AFTERNOON HOURS AT MANY LOCATIONS.

 
Summer average temperature records were set at nine locations in 2010, mainly in the southeast half of Arkansas. It was extremely hot in the summer (June through August) of 2010. Numerous records were set, including a top sizzling average temperature of 85.8 degrees at Little Rock (Pulaski County). This eclipsed other notable averages in 1954 (85.4 ºF) and 1980 (84.8 ºF).
In the picture: Summer average temperature records were set at nine locations in 2010, mainly in the southeast half of Arkansas.

 

Much like 2010, this summer started off abnormally warm. High pressure built over Arkansas in early June, and was a frequent visitor through July.  
A ridge of high pressure ("HIGH") was over Arkansas on 06/03/2011.
In the picture: A ridge of high pressure (“HIGH”) was over Arkansas on 06/03/2011. Clockwise flow around the high drove storm systems and fronts well to the north of the state…leaving the region hot and mostly dry.

 

Under the high, temperatures were well above normal. In fact, through the first two months of summer (June and July), readings were higher than 2010. It was also dry, with much less rain than a year ago. This summer was on pace to be one of the hottest and top five driest on record at Little Rock (Pulaski County).

 

  2011 2010
Site Avg Temp/Rank (Hottest) Rain/Rank (Driest) Avg Temp Rain
Fayetteville (NW AR) 81.6°(1) 1.60″(2) 78.8° 11.85″
Harrison (NC AR) 81.5°(1) 1.84″(2) 79.4° 13.35″
Jonesboro (NE AR) 84.2°(2) 3.47″(NA) 83.5° 4.08″
Fort Smith (WC AR) 88.2°(1) 0.66″(1) 84.0° 7.83″
Little Rock (C AR) 85.6°(1) 1.41″(3) 85.5° 3.60″
West Memphis (EC AR) 83.4°(1) 3.84″(8) 83.0° 8.83″
Texarkana (SW AR) 86.2°(1) 1.55″(4) 83.3° 5.45″
El Dorado (SC AR) 84.5°(3) 2.69″(8) 83.6° 5.83″
Pine Bluff (SE AR) 84.8°(1) 2.32″(3) 84.0° 6.32″
Note: Temperature, rainfall and ranks are from June 1st through July 31st. “NA” means not in the Top 10.

 

The heat was especially intense over the western counties. At Fort Smith (Sebastian County), there were 27 straight 100 degree days through July 31st. For the month (31 days), readings reached the century mark 25 times at DeQueen (Sevier County), 20 times at Texarkana (Miller County) and 15 times at Russellville (Pope County).

Given hot and dry conditions, the ground water supply was slowly decreasing, and drought conditions were expanding northward. There will be little improvement unless the existing weather pattern changes, or a tropical system brings significant precipitation.

 

Hundred degree days in 2011. While the situation was bad in Arkansas, it was even worse farther south and west. For the year (through July), there were 65 days of triple digit temperatures at San Angelo, TX. This surpassed the previous record (60 days), with a month of summer remaining. At Midland, TX…there was a grand total of 0.16 inch of rain.
In the picture: Hundred degree days in 2011.

THE FOLLOWING IS AN ARTICLE FROM NOAA.

Average U.S. temperature increases by 0.5 degrees F

New 1981-2010 ‘normals’ to be released this week

June 29, 2011

Statewide changes in annual "normal temperatures" (1981 - 2010 compared to 1971 - 2000).

Statewide changes in annual “normal temperatures” (1981 – 2010 compared to 1971 – 2000).

Download here. (Credit: NOAA)

According to the 1981-2010 normals to be released by NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) on July 1, temperatures across the United States were on average, approximately 0.5 degree F warmer than the 1971-2000 time period.

Normals serve as a 30 year baseline average of important climate variables that are used to understand average climate conditions at any location and serve as a consistent point of reference. The new normals update the 30-year averages of climatological variables, including average temperature and precipitation for more than 7,500 locations across the United States. This once-a-decade update will replace the current 1971–2000 normals.

In the continental United States, every state’s annual maximum and minimum temperature increased on average. “The climate of the 2000s is about 1.5 degree F warmer than the 1970s, so we would expect the updated 30-year normals to be warmer,” said Thomas R. Karl, L.H.D., NCDC director.

Using standards established by the World Meteorological Organization, the 30-year normals are used to compare current climate conditions with recent history. Local weathercasters traditionally use normals for comparisons with the day’s weather conditions.

In addition to their application in the weather sector, normals are used extensively by electric and gas companies for short- and long-term energy use projections. NOAA’s normals are also used by some states as the standard benchmark by which they determine the statewide rate that utilities are allowed to charge their customers.

The agricultural sector also heavily depends on normals. Farmers rely on normals to help make decisions on both crop selection and planting times. Agribusinesses use normals to monitor “departures from normal conditions” throughout the growing season and to assess past and current crop yields.

NCDC made many improvements and additions to the scientific methodology used to calculate the 1981-2010 normals. They include improved scientific quality control and statistical techniques. Comparisons to previous normals take these new techniques into account. The 1981-2010 normals provide a more comprehensive suite of precipitation and snowfall statistics. In addition, NCDC is providing hourly normals for more than 250 stations at the request of users, such as the energy industry.

Some of the key climate normals include: monthly and daily maximum temperature; monthly and daily minimum temperature; daily and monthly precipitation and snowfall statistics; and daily and monthly heating and cooling degree days. The 1981-2010 climate normals is one of the suite of climate services NOAA provides government, business and community leaders so they can make informed decisions. NOAA and its predecessor agencies have been providing updated 30-year normals once every decade since the 1921-1950 normals were released in 1956.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth’s environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on Facebook, Twitter and our other social media channels.

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s